Deepest Dive and Plastic Found

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Deepest Dive and Plastic Found

Kadin Miller, Writer

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This month, the deepest dive into the Mariana trench occurred. The dive took over over four hours long. They dived 38,353 feet into the deep dark trench. This is a new diving record that beats Titanic director James Cameron’s previous record. Their team observed four species that could give clue’s to the origin to life. As well as plastic bags and candy wrappers. This is terrible that even in places on Earth that are extremely hard to reach, plastic waste exists there. This just goes to show how bad plastic is for our environment.

Plastic bags on average take ten years  to start decomposing. In the ocean, different factors affect this. Plastic in the ocean breaks down into smaller particles that humans can’t even see. These small plastic particles are dangerous for the wildlife in the ocean because most fish end up swallowing these small particles. This harms the fish and usually ends up killing them. These small plastic particles will usually end up staying in the food chain because the plastics stay in the stomach of the fish until it is eaten by another fish and this cycle just continues forever.

The main goal of their mission is to create detailed maps of the the deepest trenches and vast seafloors. This is a long process that they hope to finish by the year 2030.  To achieve this goal they had to first design and build a submarine that could handle the deep ocean pressure. The limiting factor is the name of the submarine and can handle up to 120 percent ocean depth. The submarine is a 2 person submarine that has a titanium outer shell.  

While down at the bottom of the trench, they believe they found a rare jellyfish. There is very little knowledge about this jellyfish. It has only ever been seen 1 other time by a Japan research team. The Japanese team named it a sea squirt.

The team that performed this dive is doing a important service to humanity. The more we know about our planet, the better.